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Annie Lee Hudson: It’s Like Putting Me In Slavery

“For someone to take from me without my say-so is like putting me back in slavery.”

Thirty-two years of teaching elementary school students in Chicago have honed Annie Lee Hudson’s ability to boil issues to their basic  terms – and nothing is more basic than freedom.

Annie Lee Hudson rejects slavery.  She makes it easy to see why she and six other Chicago teachers fought heavy-handed officials of the Chicago Teachers Union in a lawsuit before the U.S. Supreme Court.

Like her fellow teachers, many of them former union members, Mrs. Hudson is being forced to pay compulsory “agency fees” to the union hierarchy to continue teaching. Big Labor’s mandate: “No dues, no job.”

Annie Lee Hudson can pay the union or she can join the unemployed.

Union officials in turn are spending the compulsory dues they demand on activities which have nothing in the world to do with collective bargaining. The result: Annie Lee Hudson and millions of workers like her are forced to finance radical political, social and ideological causes they would never support voluntarily.

And when teachers protest, they wind up in a kangaroo court controlled by the very same union pros who claimed to “represent” them in the first place.  

From start to finish, the scheme violates basic human liberties. Annie Lee Hudson knows it; her fellow teachers know it; and so does the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit.

The appeals court ruled that major portions of the compulsory dues setup are unconstitutional.

The case went before the U.S. Supreme Court only because greedy union officials refused to relent.

“I believe in unions – I do not believe in arrogance and corruption and people doing me any kind of way they  want because they’re the only game in town,” Mrs. Hudson offers. “Unions have become very, very arrogant.”

When this case went before the highest court in the land, Annie Lee Hudson and her colleagues were represented, as they have been since 1983, by attorneys for the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation.

The Foundation is proud of its role of assistance and, in fact, is helping everyone it can currently in more than 150 cases involving violations of academic and political freedom, illegal union political spending, union violence and other abuses of basic human rights.

If you would like to help people like Annie Lee Hudson, we’d like to hear from you.